Bottled Water Facts

What is Bottled Water?

Bottled water is water sold/given to consumers in sealed containers. It must, therefore, meet all applicable federal and provincial regulations for drinking water. Bottled water cannot contain sweeteners or chemical additives and must be calorie and sugar free.

 

Definitions

There are many different types of bottled water. The CBWA offers the following definitions to help in your selection (based on Health Canada proposed regulation for Division 12):

 

Natural Water

Shall be water obtained from an underground or approved natural source or sources.

 

Spring Water

Shall be water collected from an underground source from which water may flow naturally to the surface of the earth. Spring water may be collected at natural emergence or with the use of a borehole. Shall have a total dissolved solids (TDS) content at any level.

 

Mineral Water

Shall be water collected from an underground source from which water may flow naturally to the surface of the earth. Mineral water may be collected either at a natural emergence or with the use of a borehole. Shall have a minimum content of 250mg/L total dissolved solids (TDS)

 

Glacial or Glacier Water1

Shall be water collected from glacial melt water, and shall maintain the same consistent composition of the major minerals and characteristics as that of the proglacial stream at the point of emergence.

 

Carbonated or “Sparkling”

When the original carbonation level has been supplemented to make the water effervescent." Naturally Carbonated” or “Naturally Sparkling” – When the water contains at the time of bottling the same level of carbon dioxide as that which naturally occurs at emergence.

 

“Packaged Water Other Than Natural Waters”

  • Shall be water obtained from an approved source or sources.
  • May be obtained from a public community water system.
  • May be significantly modified in its composition or characteristics through safe and suitable processes.
  • Processing may include ozone, or chlorine or any safe and suitable antimicrobial agents or processes.
  • Processing may include reduction or removal of dissolved gases or undissolved solids.
  • Processing may include reduction or removal of unstable substance.
  • Shall as packaged comply with Maximum Allowable Concentrations as defined in the Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water Quality.
  • Permitted “Standard of Identity” for Packaged Water other than natural waters

 

Demineralized Water

Treated water that shall have a total dissolved solids (TDS) content not exceeding 10 mg/L. Treatment used can be processes such as: reverse osmosis, deionisation and any other approved treatment.

 

Distilled Water

  • Treatment included vaporization and condensation, with finished product total dissolved solids (TDS) content is 10 mg/L or less. Can be called "Demineralized" or "Distilled".
  • Re-mineralized Water
  • May have a total dissolved solids (TDS) content at any level.

 

"Drinking”

Optional qualifier in front of “water” in the common name (e.g. “distilled drinking water”, “demineralised drinking water”. “Drinking” does not add or distract from consumer understanding.

 

Industry Emergency Relief

CBWA and its members work with various local, provincial and federal government agencies on emergency preparedness programs to allow greater efficiency in addressing delivery of bottled water in cases of emergency relief. The bottled water industry has provided millions of litres of bottled water over the years in response to emergencies that have temporarily interrupted the delivery of safe drinking water.

 

  • Donations of bottled water were made to Trenton, Ontario and Moncton, New Brunswick flood victims in 2008;
  • CBWA members donated 200,000 litres of bottled water to help many Vancouverites through the aftermath of storms in November 2006, which disrupted municipal water treatment;
  • Millions of litres were donated to help the victims of Hurricane Katrina in 2005; and
  • Over 1.5 million litres of bottled water was donated to the citizens of Walkerton, Ontario after their municipal wells were contaminated in 2000.

 

Please visit the FAQ section if you have questions.

 

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